Smart Mobility: Is the future really electric?

24 February 2016,   By   

In the modern age, increasing global awareness of the need to minimise pollution, curb worsening climate change and reduce dependence on oil and petroleum products has begun to fundamentally change the outlook of several key industries such as utility, manufacturing – and mobility.

 

With this report we want to give you an insight of recent and future developments in the E-Mobility sector. The e-mobility sector can be divided into two main segments:

  • Electronic Vehicle Manufacturing
  • E-Mobility Infrastructure

 

The largest driver of the e-mobility sector continues to be car manufacturers, with a strong backing by governmental bodies globally, who mostly see e-mobility as part of the solution to reduce global warming. While public sponsorship and financial incentives set by national governments vary country to country, three main cornerstones can be identified as:

  • Direct purchase subsidies
  • Annual or reoccurring fee discounts
  • Income tax incentives

 

Utilities will play an important role in the provision of infrastructure, and in addition to power management, will likely look to provide the following services to enhance their market position:

  • Installation of public charging stations
  • Installation of private charging stations
  • Value added services

 

Space providers are the largest supplier of public charging stations, with:

  • 19% found in car parks
  • 13.1% found on public roads

 

Electronic Vehicles can be divided into four main subgroups bases on their powertrains

  • Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV)
  • Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV)
  • Battery Electric Vehicle (BHEV)
  • Range extended Electric Vehicle (REEV)

 

With the market still being in an early stage, the main focus of most car manufacturers remains to be research and development, with:

  • $7 bn
  • Spent on R&D between 2008 and 2014

 

Batteries are going to be a key driver of future production, with an emphasis on lowering the cost, and increasing the performance. However, the mass consumer remains relatively hesitant to purchase an EV, with decreased convenience, and cost and risk of adoption being major factors.

 

Situation in Austria

Austria’s regulatory incentive landscape is currently very fragmented. There are only a few approaches which cover all nine federal states. Listed are the top three incentives, which are valid in all federal states of Austria:

  1. Electric vehicles are exempt from fuel consumption tax, monthly vehicle tax, and the 16% acquisition tax
  2. Sponsorship from Kommunalkredit AG of up to EUR 20,000 for the purchase of electric vehicles applicable for companies, entrepreneurs, associations, public regional authorities and confessional bodies until December 31, 2020
  3. Sponsorship from Kommunalkredit AG of up to EUR 20,000 for the purchase of electric vehicles of public interest (such as taxis or car sharing vehicles) for companies, entrepreneurs, associations, public regional authorities and confessional bodies until October 2015

Certain Austrian federal states provide individual tax and fee incentives depending on various circumstances.

 

If you are interested in knowing more about the situation in Austria, the global comparison of Incentives and the regulations we highly recommend you to download our free report on E-Mobility.